Posts Tagged ‘CSA’

Everything-But-the-Kitchen-Sink Kimchi

I love kimchi.  This, however, is not real kimchi.  It’s a nod to the spicy, stinky, probiotic goodness and an experiment in using what’s on hand.  It’s a riff on my homemade kimchi recipe.  We had such a huge harvest list in this week’s CSA that I’m just incorporating the things that would otherwise go to the chickens.  And the ladies have enough pasture right now.

  • 1 head bok choy
  • 1 bunch beet greens
  • 1 bunch kohlrabi greens
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 garlic bulb with greens (Use the garlic cloves like normal; wash out the greens and cut into 2″ pieces to make food processing easier)
  • 1″ piece peeled fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup paprika
  • 1 Tbsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/8 cup soy sauce
  • 1 can anchovies, oil drained (if you’re into the raw food thing, use raw oysters)
  • 1/2 cup 1-inch pieces scallions (greens and whites)
  • 1/2 cup julienned carrots and/or daikon radish (optional)

Remove and wash the leafy veg.  Slice the leaves into long strips.  Sprinkle with salt and toss.  Leave out to wilt on the counter covered for approximately 24 hours.

In a food processor, add the garlic, ginger, peppers, soy sauce, and anchovies.  Process until it becomes a paste.  Toss the paste with the cabbage, scallions, and carrots.

For a more pungent flavor, allow this to ferment in a cool place (<68F) in your lactic fermentation crock for approximately 24 hours.  Otherwise pack it into sealed glass jars and store in the refrigerator.  The kimchi will be ready to eat in as little as 1 day, but is better when it starts to bubble with the probiotic fermentation process.  It’ll keep in the refrigerator for months and is a great way to extend the shelf life of veggies.

Here’s the first step of veg + salt…

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And the next day, packed and ready for the refrigerator:

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Fresh Apricot Tart

Fresh apricots are available locally for a brief, but glorious season.  They shine in this European-style rustic tart or galette.

  • 1/2 recipe butter pie crust
  • generous 1/2 of a 1/4 peck bag fresh apricots, washed, pitted, and halved
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 bantam-sized egg, lightly scrambled
  • 1 Tbsp coarse sugar
  • 1/4 cup apricot preserves
  • 1 Tbsp water

Preheat the oven to 350F.

Toss the apricots, sugar, and cornstarch in a bowl.  Roll out the pie crust and transfer to a baking dish (I recommend using parchment paper or nonstick aluminum foil so the tart doesn’t stick).  Arrange the apricots on the crust and fold the edges around.  If the apricots are falling over and pushing the crust out, you can use toothpicks or skewers to hold it together while baking.  Use a pastry brush to coat the top of the pie crust with the egg.  Sprinkle the egg-washed crust with coarse sugar.  Bake for 60-70 minutes at 350F.

Allow tart to come to room temperature.  Mix apricot preserves with water to form a glaze.  Using a pastry brush, glaze the apricots with the preserves mixture.   Enjoy!

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Kohlrabi Salad Revisited

Still looking for kohlrabi inspiration?  Me too.  I finally developed a taste for the bulb in my  my favorite kohlrabi salad.  But the greens?  Hmm.  Instead of immediately throwing the greens to the chickens, I thought I’d revisit that recipe and see if they can’t be incorporated.  Besides, the chickens have enough pasture this time of year and I’m trying to up the brassica (cabbage family) superfoods in my diet.  The greens are certainly tougher than delicate lettuces, but they provide a crunchier, coleslaw-like texture to the salad.  If you prepare the salad ahead of time, it will give them time to soften in the dressing.

In a bowl, whisk together the Vinaigrette:

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp olive or grapeseed oil

Toss in the Greens:

  • 1 large bulb kohlrabi, peeled and sliced thin
  • kohlrabi green, thick stems removed, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tbsp capers

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Bok Choy Salad with Asian Dressing

Before summer really heats up, the cool-weather, superfood, cruciferous Bok Choy appears in CSA boxes alongside of peas and early carrots.  Although I usually make it into a quick stir-fry, it’s quite nice in raw salads too.

In a large bowl, whisk together this Asian-inspired dressing:

  • 1 Tbsp Rice Wine Vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Soy  Sauce
  • 1 Tbsp Sesame Oil
  • Optional Seasonings:  1 minced clove garlic, 1 Tbsp minced ginger, a few shakes of crushed red pepper flakes

Toss in the following salad veggies:

  • 1 Large Bok Choy, thinly sliced
  • Optional: Carrots, cut into matchsticks
  • Optional: Sugar snap peas, chopped

Voila!  Side dish served.  To make it a main course, you can add tofu or some leftover grilled/roasted meat or poultry.

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Kohlrabi Salad

I never used to know what to do with Kohlrabi. I’ve tried it baked, grilled, and boiled. Blah. Although I suppose it’s ok roasted with a bunch of other root vegetables, its currently 97F outside and there is no way I’m turning on the oven. Then I discovered it raw in this salad combination. It reminds of the seedless part of a cucumber: Mild, refreshing and crunchy. It’s also quite easy to make as it only requires a quick toss.  The vinaigrette is a keeper for a variety of salads… green, pasta, potato.

Kohlrabi Salad (serves 4)

  • 1 large bulb kohlrabi, peeled and sliced thin
  • 2 cups greens
  • 1 Tbsp capers
  • 1 Tbsp Vinaigrette (see below)

Vinaigrette

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1″ piece fresh ginger, minced
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 c olive or grapeseed oil

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East Meets West: Bok Choy and Pasta

Bok Choy often pairs with Asian stir-fry, but I think the mild flavor lends itself to other regional cuisine. Here it’s added to Mediterranean pasta, cheeses, and herbs for a quick meal. I don’t have exact measurements because this is supposed to be fast – it will take as long as the pasta to cook – so just eyeball it.

East Meets West Pasta for Two

  • 1 cup pasta (Prepare according to package instructions. I recommend Food For Life’s Ezekiel 4:9 penne because it’s quick cooking and a complete protein.)
  • olive oil (about 2 tsp)
  • large handful fresh mushrooms (I used shiitake today, but a mix or others would be great, too.)
  • 2 heads of baby bok choy, chopped into 1″ pieces
  • 2 Tbsp grated Parmigiana or Romano cheese (or use Vegan substitute)
  • 1 oz. feta cheese (omit for Vegan)
  • pinch of fresh herbs such as oregano, basil, and/or parsley

Get the water boiling for the pasta and begin to cook according to the package instructions. In a saute pan, heat to medium low, drizzle about a tsp of olive oil, and cook the mushrooms until softened and beginning to brown. You may want to cover if they are too dry. Remove cover if using and add the bok choy. Cook until just wilted. Add to mushrooms and boy choy to the pasta along with the cheese and another drizzle of olive oil.

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Almond Romano Pesto and a Nod to Pestos in General

Got herbs in your garden or CSA? Make pesto! There’s much room for creativity, it’s marvelous and versatile stuff, and stores for weeks in the refrigerator.

The Basics…

  • 1 Bunch of Leafy Herbs (Basil, Parsley, Arugula, Oregano, etc.)
  • 1 Tbsp Nuts (Pine Nuts, Almonds, Walnuts, Pistachios, etc.)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup hard cheese (Parmigiana, Romano, Asiago, etc.)

Almond Romano Pesto

  • 1 bunch Parsely
  • 1 Tbsp Almonds
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/3 cups olive oil
  • 1/3 cup Pecorino Romano Cheese

Toss it all into the food processor and process until it becomes a paste. Step back and smell the herbs. Your whole house will now smell fresh and green. Happy sigh. Add more olive oil if it’s too thick. Store in a lidded jar with a layer of olive oil, which will help it keep its bright color. Use it on pastas, in sandwiches, and on bruschetta, which is an Italian-style toast.

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When you’re ready to use, scoop out what you need, making sure the layer of olive oil is still enough to cover.

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