Archive for the ‘Local Culinary Adventure’ Category

Kohlrabi Salad Revisited

Still looking for kohlrabi inspiration?  Me too.  I finally developed a taste for the bulb in my  my favorite kohlrabi salad.  But the greens?  Hmm.  Instead of immediately throwing the greens to the chickens, I thought I’d revisit that recipe and see if they can’t be incorporated.  Besides, the chickens have enough pasture this time of year and I’m trying to up the brassica (cabbage family) superfoods in my diet.  The greens are certainly tougher than delicate lettuces, but they provide a crunchier, coleslaw-like texture to the salad.  If you prepare the salad ahead of time, it will give them time to soften in the dressing.

In a bowl, whisk together the Vinaigrette:

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp olive or grapeseed oil

Toss in the Greens:

  • 1 large bulb kohlrabi, peeled and sliced thin
  • kohlrabi green, thick stems removed, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tbsp capers

IMG_3733

Of Asphalt and Chestnut Honey

I’ve had a honey epiphany.  As a consumer of our local liquid amber, I’ve seen variations of flavor and color over the seasons and years, but always sweet and delicious.  Except, of course, for that memorable year when the town paved the roads and the honey had, let’s call it, um, distinctive asphalt notes.

Here’s the amazing discovery.  I made a recipe from a friend that required Italian chestnut honey.  I was assured that it was integral to the recipe and to forget about local, get on the Internet, and order me some.  Fine.  It arrived.  I opened it.  Took a sniff.  Bleck.  Had it gone bad in transit?  I then read the label, which described it as (and I quote) “ideal for who don’t like very sweet flavour honey.” I took a lick.  Double bleck!  Had I just been poisoned by the infamous Internet Tuscan honey mafia? More reading… The site Serious Eats describes chestnut honey as “not for the timid palate” and “Dark and spicy, with touches of smoke and leather, chestnut honey is complex, mysterious, and nuanced.”  Yup, that about sums it up.  Leather and smoke.  But in defense, it did impart a distinct and magnificent flavour to the recipe.

IMG_3370

IMG_3372

Bottom line… I had no idea that honey could be so variable, which makes me want to embark on my dream beekeeping project even more.  But, after the great rooster disaster of 2012, I’m not eager to once again mix toddlers and talons until the kids are much older.

Ps.  Welcome back! It’s been ages since my last post because our family welcomed a new addition to our ranks.  Priorities, now.  So as baby sits by me and assists with “yayayayayayaYAyaya” we can now find the time to get back to hobby blogging about our minifarm.

Kohlrabi Salad

I never used to know what to do with Kohlrabi. I’ve tried it baked, grilled, and boiled. Blah. Although I suppose it’s ok roasted with a bunch of other root vegetables, its currently 97F outside and there is no way I’m turning on the oven. Then I discovered it raw in this salad combination. It reminds of the seedless part of a cucumber: Mild, refreshing and crunchy. It’s also quite easy to make as it only requires a quick toss.  The vinaigrette is a keeper for a variety of salads… green, pasta, potato.

Kohlrabi Salad (serves 4)

  • 1 large bulb kohlrabi, peeled and sliced thin
  • 2 cups greens
  • 1 Tbsp capers
  • 1 Tbsp Vinaigrette (see below)

Vinaigrette

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1″ piece fresh ginger, minced
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 c olive or grapeseed oil

20120623-184657.jpg

Grilled Garlic Scapes

I think I’ve discovered a use for nearly every part of the garlic plant. The bulb is the part everyone knows how to use, the greens go into pesto, and the scapes are terrific on the grill or lightly sautéed and added to omelets or quiches.

Planted in the fall, our garlic continues on its merry maturation cycle.  It recently sent up the flowering part of the plant or scape, which we chop off so that the plant can put its energy towards that delicious bulb.  Toss with a pinch of salt and drizzle of olive oil.

20120623-184622.jpg

A little grill flame and ta-da!  One guest described them as garlicky green beans.

 

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush or My Foraging Adventure

Once upon a time, there was a grand old mulberry tree. Then a parking lot rolled over its roots and it nearly died. But that mulberry would not give up. It sent up suckers and continues to bear fruit to this day for all those lucky enough to know it’s edible.

To identify a mulberry tree, look for three distinct leave shapes.

During their fruiting season, they will have berries in all stages of ripeness along their branches.

20120617-073846.jpg

When the berries are ripe, they will turn a dark (you won’t believe this) mulberry color and will nearly fly off the branches when touched.

20120617-073912.jpg

Enjoy!

20120617-074721.jpg

%d bloggers like this: