Archive for the ‘Farm Fresh Eggs’ Category

Green Eggs and Ham (a.k.a. Pesto Eggs & Prosciutto)

In an effort to get children to eat something green (haha!), I thought I’d try this Dr. Seuss connection.  While it didn’t work for the kids, (yuck!) it did work deliciously for the adults (yum!).

For each serving:

  • 1 egg
  • about 1 tsp olive oil or butter for pan
  • salt to taste
  • 1 Tbsp basil, pine nut, and romano or other pesto
  • 1 slice ham or prosciutto
  • 1 english muffin or slice toast or slice polenta

You have some assembly options…

Sunny Side Up, Over Easy, or Fried Eggs:  Fry an egg in the pan with olive oil and salt until done to your liking.  Toast the english muffin, bread, or polenta slice.  Add the ham or prosciutto on top, followed by the egg, and top with the pesto.

Scrambled Eggs: Scramble an egg with pesto and fry in a pan until done to your liking.  Place atop the toast along with the meat or serve separately.

Below is a photo of an over easy version, which I like best because the basil retains its bright green color and contrasts beautifully with the golden egg yolk.

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Pasta alla Carbonara

The eggs and cheese create a luxuriant, rich, and creamy pasta sauce.  Bonus:  Leftovers can be refrigerated in a baking dish and baked the following day, the result which tastes like the world’s best baked mac n’ cheese.

  • 3 eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 cup grated romano cheese, at room temperature, plus more for serving
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil (If you have a particularly fatty cut of pancetta you may not need the oil at all)
  • 1/4-1/2 lb. diced pancetta, guanciale or bacon
  • 1 lb. pasta, cooked in salted water according to directions until “al dente” (Our favorite is fresh fettucine)
  • Approximately 1/2 cup reserved pasta water (You may need to add more or less liquid; add slowly until the sauce reaches a creamy consistency)
  • Optional:  1/2 cup white wine (If you use the wine, cut out the corresponding amount of pasta water)
  • Optional:  1-2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced if sautéing or minced if adding raw as a finishing ingredient
  • Optional:  handful chopped Italian parsley
  • Optional:  black pepper to taste

Heat the olive oil and sauté the meat until until it is browned and the fat has rendered. If you want the optional garlic cooked, you can add the slices once the meat is nearly finished.  Set aside.  Ps. I’ve seen recipes that the include the hot cooking fat as part of the cream sauce; others only using the pancetta bits at the end:  Your choice.  Personally, I find this dish to be heavy enough so I only use the browned pancetta bits.

In a large bowl, mix together the eggs and cheese. Set aside.

Cook the pasta in salted water according to directions until “al dente.” Working quickly, start by adding about 1/2 cup of the pasta water or wine into the egg-cheese mixture until a creamy sauce forms.  Using tongs, remove the pasta from the boiling water and immediately add to sauce.   Toss until coated along with the meat and any other optional ingredients. If the sauce it too thick, add some more of the reserved pasta sauce.  Serve immediately and pass additional cheese alongside.

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Ps. This is one of those raw or undercooked egg recipes.  You know the risks and warnings, right?

Egg Drop Soup

The eggs form beautiful ribbons in this quick Asian-inspired soup.  To make a complete dinner, serve alongside rice and stir-fried bok choy.

  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock (If you don’t have homemade, use 1 14-oz. can)
  • 1 8-oz. pkg. baked teriyaki tofu, sliced into 1/4×1/4×2″ pieces (You can substitute plain firm or extra-firm tofu, or 1 7.75-oz. can chickpeas)
  • 1 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 eggs, whisked
  • 1 small bunch chives or 2 scallions, chopped

Heat the stock, tofu, soy sauce, and sesame oil to boiling.  Reduce to bare simmer.  Slowly pour in the eggs in a thin stream, stirring constantly so that they form “ribbons” while they cook in the hot liquid.  Remove from heat, garnish with onions, and serve.

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Scotch Eggs

A gastropub favorite:  Hardboiled eggs wrapped in sausage and then fried.  Husband says these are proof that wife loves him.  Wife thinks these belly bombers may be proof that wife is trying to give husband a heart attack.  You decide 🙂

Eggs:  Roll the eggs in the flour…

  • 6 hardboiled eggs, peeled (you can make these ahead of time).
  • 1/4 cup flour

Sausage:  Either wrap your floured, hardboiled eggs in 1 lb. prepared breakfast sausage or make your own by mixing together…

  • 1 lb ground pork sausage meat
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup plain breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 cup fresh chopped herbs (recommended half italian parsley and half sage)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper

For frying:  Once your eggs are wrapped in the sausage, pass through the scrambled egg, coat with bread crumbs, and fry until browned (about 5-6 minutes)

  • 1-2 eggs, lightly scrambled
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs (plain or panko)
  • oil for frying… you can get the deep fryer out if you’ve got it!
  • salt for finishing

For serving:

  • Mustard, mayonnaise, or salad greens

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Egg-in-the-Hole or Egg-in-a-Nest or Egg-in-a-Basket or Whatever You Call It, It’s Good!

Armed with a simple cookie cutter, this recipe transforms breakfast for even the most reluctant eater.  It’s essentially eggs and toast with a twist, but kids love the fun of it!

  • 1 slice bread (We use whole grain, but you could you whichever is your favorite)
  • 1 egg
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 pats butter
  • Optional:  A sprinkle of omelet-friendly ingredients, such as a grated cheese or diced veggies

Use a cookie cutter to cut a shape from the bread.  Our hen cookie cutter is the family favorite!

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In a pan set to medium-low, melt a pat of butter, fry the cutout until golden brown on both sides, and set aside.  Melt the second pat of butter in the pan and add the frame.  You have some options here:  Either crack the egg directly into the hole or scramble first.  If you go with the latter option, you can add omelet-friendly ingredients, such as a sprinkle of cheddar cheese or a tiny bit of cut veggies.  Season with salt and pepper.

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Fry until golden brown on both sides or until egg reaches desired doneness.  You can either break the yolk or leave it whole and runny for dipping with the cutout.  Serve warm.

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Any Morning French Toast

A breakfast classic!  This is by far the most requested breakfast item in our house.  The children love the flavor and mommy loves that it is a way to regularly enjoy our hen’s bounty whilst frugally reclaiming stale bread that would otherwise be thrown away.

  • 1 slice of your favorite bread (We use a whole grain for weekday breakfasts, broiche or other egg-based bread for the occasional fancy weekend brunch, and most importantly to use up whatever bread that has gone stale)
  • 1 egg
  • 1-3 Tbsp milk (This depends on the size of the egg, the staleness of the bread, and your own preference)
  • dash of cinnamon
  • 1 pat of butter
  • drizzle of local honey and/or maple syrup (Use this to serve atop the finished french toast and/or mix it into the egg mixture prior to cooking)

Scramble together the egg, milk, cinnamon and optional honey/syrup.  Add bread and allow to soak up the liquid.  In a pan heated to medium low, melt the butter and then add the toast.  Cover.  Cook until golden browned on each side, flipping once.  Serve warm.

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Traditional Flan (Pudim Flan)

What sweeter way to use up farm fresh eggs than with a Portuguese flan?!

Egg Note: Do consider the size of the eggs in the recipe. Oddly enough, there isn’t much difference in yolk size from a small to a jumbo egg, but the white part changes in volume rather dramatically. What does this mean? If you are using small eggs, which are usually from younger or bantam chickens, this will mean that you will have a richer, yolkier flan because the yolk to white ratio is much higher. When small eggs are what I have on hand, I will use 10 small eggs instead of 8 large eggs and two egg yolks.

Traditional Flan (Pudim Flan)

Caramel Sauce:

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup water

Make sure you have flan dish. You can purchase Portuguese flan mold at a specialty store or use 6-8 individual ramekins.

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Simmer over medium low heat until the syrup caramelizes and turns a deep golden brown. Keep an eye on this pot because it will go from boiling sugar…

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… to perfect golden brown caramel in seconds. Likewise it can go from perfect golden to to burnt in seconds, too. It take about 5-10 minutes for the color to develop.

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At this point you have a choice… You can either pour ALL the sugar into a large flan mold or 6-8 individual ramekins OR you can pour about a 1/4 cup of the stuff into the custard and the rest into the flan mold.   My father-in-law’s family does the former and mother-in-law’s family does the latter.  In her version, the caramel in the flan infuses the whole custard with that caramel flavor and makes it much darker in color.  Either way, remember that hot sugar syrup burns so make sure you are careful and use pot holders! Rotate the pan to coat both the bottom and sides and set aside.

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Custard:

  • 4 cups (1 quart) whole milk
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick (optional)
  • peel of one lemon without the pith (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp port wine (optional)
  • 8 large eggs
  • 2 egg yolks

Heat the oven to 350F. Beat the eggs, sugar, and milk together until frothy. Add the cinnamon stick and lemon peel if using. Heat on the stovetop until warm. Remove from the heat and add the port wine if using. Strain into the prepared mold(s).

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Place the custard dish into a water bath, which is quite easy to make: Simply place an oven-safe dish into the preheated oven, put the custard dish inside, and fill with boiling water until it comes halfway up the custard dish.

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Bake 45 minutes or until knife inserted in the middle of the custard comes out clean. If you are using smaller ramekins, 35 minutes should be enough.

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Chill completely before unmolding by topping with a large plate and flipping upside down.

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