Archive for August, 2013

The Workout Smoothie or Sneaky Veg For Kids

This smoothie is perfect for either a pre- or post-workout boost.  It’s filling, yet leaves you feeling light.  Best yet, it’s a fabulous raw food nutritional powerhouse that even kids will love.  Instead of a recipe, it’s more of a formula that can be played with as fruit comes into season.

In a blender, add:

  • 1 cup liquid (Choose from unsweetened soy milk, kefir, yogurt, water & ice, etc.)
  • 1 banana (I know that this is so not local, but it’s my weakness!  I think smoothies just scream for that creamy texture they impart.)
  • 1 cup (or the equivalent) local fruit in season (This morning I used a single large nectarine.)
  • Handful of greens (This morning I went into the garden and harvested some red Swiss chard)
  • 1 Tbsp flaxmeal

Simply puree until smooth and serve.  Just don’t tell the kids that there is anything green in there until after they’ve enjoyed it!

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Egg Drop Soup

The eggs form beautiful ribbons in this quick Asian-inspired soup.  To make a complete dinner, serve alongside rice and stir-fried bok choy.

  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock (If you don’t have homemade, use 1 14-oz. can)
  • 1 8-oz. pkg. baked teriyaki tofu, sliced into 1/4×1/4×2″ pieces (You can substitute plain firm or extra-firm tofu, or 1 7.75-oz. can chickpeas)
  • 1 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 eggs, whisked
  • 1 small bunch chives or 2 scallions, chopped

Heat the stock, tofu, soy sauce, and sesame oil to boiling.  Reduce to bare simmer.  Slowly pour in the eggs in a thin stream, stirring constantly so that they form “ribbons” while they cook in the hot liquid.  Remove from heat, garnish with onions, and serve.

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Purslane Summer Salad (Help! There are Weeds in my CSA Share!)

I opened my CSA share this week to find a bunch of weeds, literally.  What??? I grow these babies in my garden, yank ’em out, and chuck ’em to the chickens.  However, having paid for this particular bunch of organic weeds, I was determined to give them a try.  Oh, and I also had less than 10  minutes to do so because husband made most of the dinner, I had only to make some veg,  I was dallying about, and completely lost track of time.  Having never cooked with Purslane before, a quick Internet search pulled up this 2002 Gourmet recipe, and here’s how I modified it:

In a saute pan on medium high, quickly sauté:

  • a drizzle of olive oil
  • 3 summer squash, sliced
  • dash of salt

While that sears, in a salad bowl whisk the dressing together:

  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped vidalia onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Add to the salad the squash (let it cool a bit) plus:

  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 bunch purslane, thick stems removed
  • 1 cup pear or cherry tomatoes, halved lengthwise

Toss and serve.  And the result?  A good salad, but I think I’d use a different green next time.  The purslane was kind of tough and bitter.

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Everything-But-the-Kitchen-Sink Kimchi

I love kimchi.  This, however, is not real kimchi.  It’s a nod to the spicy, stinky, probiotic goodness and an experiment in using what’s on hand.  It’s a riff on my homemade kimchi recipe.  We had such a huge harvest list in this week’s CSA that I’m just incorporating the things that would otherwise go to the chickens.  And the ladies have enough pasture right now.

  • 1 head bok choy
  • 1 bunch beet greens
  • 1 bunch kohlrabi greens
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 garlic bulb with greens (Use the garlic cloves like normal; wash out the greens and cut into 2″ pieces to make food processing easier)
  • 1″ piece peeled fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup paprika
  • 1 Tbsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/8 cup soy sauce
  • 1 can anchovies, oil drained (if you’re into the raw food thing, use raw oysters)
  • 1/2 cup 1-inch pieces scallions (greens and whites)
  • 1/2 cup julienned carrots and/or daikon radish (optional)

Remove and wash the leafy veg.  Slice the leaves into long strips.  Sprinkle with salt and toss.  Leave out to wilt on the counter covered for approximately 24 hours.

In a food processor, add the garlic, ginger, peppers, soy sauce, and anchovies.  Process until it becomes a paste.  Toss the paste with the cabbage, scallions, and carrots.

For a more pungent flavor, allow this to ferment in a cool place (<68F) in your lactic fermentation crock for approximately 24 hours.  Otherwise pack it into sealed glass jars and store in the refrigerator.  The kimchi will be ready to eat in as little as 1 day, but is better when it starts to bubble with the probiotic fermentation process.  It’ll keep in the refrigerator for months and is a great way to extend the shelf life of veggies.

Here’s the first step of veg + salt…

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And the next day, packed and ready for the refrigerator:

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Scotch Eggs

A gastropub favorite:  Hardboiled eggs wrapped in sausage and then fried.  Husband says these are proof that wife loves him.  Wife thinks these belly bombers may be proof that wife is trying to give husband a heart attack.  You decide 🙂

Eggs:  Roll the eggs in the flour…

  • 6 hardboiled eggs, peeled (you can make these ahead of time).
  • 1/4 cup flour

Sausage:  Either wrap your floured, hardboiled eggs in 1 lb. prepared breakfast sausage or make your own by mixing together…

  • 1 lb ground pork sausage meat
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup plain breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 cup fresh chopped herbs (recommended half italian parsley and half sage)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper

For frying:  Once your eggs are wrapped in the sausage, pass through the scrambled egg, coat with bread crumbs, and fry until browned (about 5-6 minutes)

  • 1-2 eggs, lightly scrambled
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs (plain or panko)
  • oil for frying… you can get the deep fryer out if you’ve got it!
  • salt for finishing

For serving:

  • Mustard, mayonnaise, or salad greens

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