Archive for June, 2013

Kohlrabi Salad Revisited

Still looking for kohlrabi inspiration?  Me too.  I finally developed a taste for the bulb in my  my favorite kohlrabi salad.  But the greens?  Hmm.  Instead of immediately throwing the greens to the chickens, I thought I’d revisit that recipe and see if they can’t be incorporated.  Besides, the chickens have enough pasture this time of year and I’m trying to up the brassica (cabbage family) superfoods in my diet.  The greens are certainly tougher than delicate lettuces, but they provide a crunchier, coleslaw-like texture to the salad.  If you prepare the salad ahead of time, it will give them time to soften in the dressing.

In a bowl, whisk together the Vinaigrette:

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp olive or grapeseed oil

Toss in the Greens:

  • 1 large bulb kohlrabi, peeled and sliced thin
  • kohlrabi green, thick stems removed, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tbsp capers

IMG_3733

Bok Choy Salad with Asian Dressing

Before summer really heats up, the cool-weather, superfood, cruciferous Bok Choy appears in CSA boxes alongside of peas and early carrots.  Although I usually make it into a quick stir-fry, it’s quite nice in raw salads too.

In a large bowl, whisk together this Asian-inspired dressing:

  • 1 Tbsp Rice Wine Vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Soy  Sauce
  • 1 Tbsp Sesame Oil
  • Optional Seasonings:  1 minced clove garlic, 1 Tbsp minced ginger, a few shakes of crushed red pepper flakes

Toss in the following salad veggies:

  • 1 Large Bok Choy, thinly sliced
  • Optional: Carrots, cut into matchsticks
  • Optional: Sugar snap peas, chopped

Voila!  Side dish served.  To make it a main course, you can add tofu or some leftover grilled/roasted meat or poultry.

IMG_3728

Of Asphalt and Chestnut Honey

I’ve had a honey epiphany.  As a consumer of our local liquid amber, I’ve seen variations of flavor and color over the seasons and years, but always sweet and delicious.  Except, of course, for that memorable year when the town paved the roads and the honey had, let’s call it, um, distinctive asphalt notes.

Here’s the amazing discovery.  I made a recipe from a friend that required Italian chestnut honey.  I was assured that it was integral to the recipe and to forget about local, get on the Internet, and order me some.  Fine.  It arrived.  I opened it.  Took a sniff.  Bleck.  Had it gone bad in transit?  I then read the label, which described it as (and I quote) “ideal for who don’t like very sweet flavour honey.” I took a lick.  Double bleck!  Had I just been poisoned by the infamous Internet Tuscan honey mafia? More reading… The site Serious Eats describes chestnut honey as “not for the timid palate” and “Dark and spicy, with touches of smoke and leather, chestnut honey is complex, mysterious, and nuanced.”  Yup, that about sums it up.  Leather and smoke.  But in defense, it did impart a distinct and magnificent flavour to the recipe.

IMG_3370

IMG_3372

Bottom line… I had no idea that honey could be so variable, which makes me want to embark on my dream beekeeping project even more.  But, after the great rooster disaster of 2012, I’m not eager to once again mix toddlers and talons until the kids are much older.

Ps.  Welcome back! It’s been ages since my last post because our family welcomed a new addition to our ranks.  Priorities, now.  So as baby sits by me and assists with “yayayayayayaYAyaya” we can now find the time to get back to hobby blogging about our minifarm.

%d bloggers like this: